If you are used to virtual relationships in DAX (see Handling Different Granularities in DAX), you probably use the following pattern relatively often:

[Filtered Measure] :=
CALCULATE (
    <target_measure>,
    FILTER (
        ALL ( <target_granularity_column> ),
        CONTAINS (
            VALUES ( <lookup_granularity_column> )
            <lookup_granularity_column>,
            <target_granularity_column> 
        )
    )
)

In the new DAX available in Excel 2016*, Power BI Desktop, and Analysis Services 2016, you can use a simpler syntax, which offers a minimal performance improvement and is much more readable:

[Filtered Measure] :=
CALCULATE (
    <target_measure>,
    INTERSECT (
        ALL ( <target_granularity_column> ),
        VALUES ( <lookup_granularity_column> )
    )
)

You can find a longer explanation of this new pattern and download some examples in the new article Physical and Virtual Relationships in DAX, on SQLBI web site.

CALCULATE
Context transition

Evaluates an expression in a context modified by filters.

CALCULATE ( <Expression> [, <Filter> [, <Filter> [, … ] ] ] )

FILTER

Returns a table that has been filtered.

FILTER ( <Table>, <FilterExpression> )

ALL
CALCULATE modifier

Returns all the rows in a table, or all the values in a column, ignoring any filters that might have been applied.

ALL ( [<TableNameOrColumnName>] [, <ColumnName> [, <ColumnName> [, … ] ] ] )

CONTAINS

Returns TRUE if there exists at least one row where all columns have specified values.

CONTAINS ( <Table>, <ColumnName>, <Value> [, <ColumnName>, <Value> [, … ] ] )

VALUES

When a column name is given, returns a single column table of unique values. When a table name is given, returns a table with the same columns and all the rows of the table (including duplicates) with the additional blank row if present.

VALUES ( <TableNameOrColumnName> )

INTERSECT

Returns the rows of left-side table which appear in right-side table.

INTERSECT ( <LeftTable>, <RightTable> )