Introduction to Data Modeling for Power BI is an introductory video course about data modeling, which is a required skill to get the best out of Power BI, Power Pivot for Excel, and Analysis Services. The training is aimed at users that do not have a background knowledge in data modeling for analytical systems and reporting.

The goal of the course is introduce the primary concepts of dimensional modeling, using practical examples and demos to illustrate how to obtain the desired result without having to write complex DAX expressions. Creating a proper data model simplifies the code to write and improves the performance. The course is made of 100 minutes of lectures. You can watch the videos at any time and the system will keep track of your advances. Within the course you can download the slides and the Power BI files used in the demos.

Curriculum

  • Presentation of Introduction to Data Modeling for Power BI

    • Presentation of Introduction to Data Modeling for Power BI
  • Slides and demos

    • How to download and use demo files
    • Demos download
    • Slides of the video course
  • Introduction to data modeling

    • Introduction to data modeling
    • Introduction
    • Scattered information
    • Business entities
  • Normalization and denormalization

    • Normalization and denormalization
    • Introducing normalization and denormalization
  • Star schemas

    • Star schemas
    • Introducing star schemas
    • Placing tables in a diagram
    • If you don't have a star schema
  • Why data modeling is useful

    • Why data modeling is useful
    • What is the role of a data model
  • Data modeling scenarios

    • Data modeling scenarios
    • Common scenarios
    • Header / detail tables
    • Back to a star schema
    • Multiple fact tables
    • Building a star schema
    • Handling multiple dates
    • Multiple relationships with date
    • Events with different durations
    • Precompute the values
  • Conclusion

    • Conclusion
Student Rating
4.9
500 ratings
89%
10%
1%
0%
0%
4-star Reviews (17 of 251)
  • giancarlo gonzales (Apr 28, 2020)

    Thanks for all

  • Taye Ogunmiloro (Apr 14, 2020)

    Great course! It would be better though if there were some provisions for practice, exercises, and tests between the lectures. Thank you, Taye Ogunmiloro

    • Thanks for the feedback! We have exercises in the full Data Modeling for Power BI video course, indeed!
      Reply by SQLBI (Apr 15, 2020)
  • Ержан Бухар (Mar 28, 2020)

    thanks it was cool

  • mark staniford (Mar 4, 2020)

    I thought I had a good understanding of dimensional modelling. I now know how much I have to learn. Thank you for opening my eyes.

  • Joao Marcelino (Feb 20, 2020)

    It´s a pity that there is no connection to the DB nor a way to download the DB, since the SQL server connection is unavailable. Otherwise, the course is brilliant. Thank you very much!

  • Matt Fraser (Nov 27, 2019)

    Very helpful, even for someone experienced in the area. Just wish there was more!

  • Matt Fraser (Nov 27, 2019)

    Very helpful, even for someone experienced in the area. Just wish there was more!

  • Jason Hurley (Nov 1, 2019)

    Very nice course! Great examples and helpful topics.

  • Robin Neven (Oct 17, 2019)

    Well explained summary of some of the data modeling issues you might run into with Power BI or Analysis Services!

  • Michael Nishimura (Oct 5, 2019)

    Overall, very good. I learned a lot. Star Schema makes sense and examples how to manage around multiple fact tables is helpful. Thanks!

  • Benjamin Kormos (Oct 5, 2019)

    It was great and clear, though the layout of the tables in presentation slides should be the same as in the PBI files for more clarity.

  • André Pinheiro (Jul 8, 2019)

    Pretty good for beginners.

  • Helmar Träger (Jul 8, 2019)

    Very interesting and presented in an easy to understand why though the subjects are a bit difficult

  • Heike Holubek (May 14, 2019)

    good introduction, mostly easy to follow

  • fatima Essahibi (Apr 23, 2019)

    thank you for this great introduction